Horse Help
 
Quote · 2629 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 

I'm new to the horse world, and I'm wondering if anyone can tell me how to properly cool down my horse after a ride? Also my horse is fairly old, 21 to be exact, and would like to know if there is a special feed I should be giving my horse?

Quote · 2628 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 

Hello maines:

Cooling a horse is important both, in summer and in winter.  There is a great step by step article here on Wikihorseworld that should help you.  Below is the link.

http://www.wikihorseworld.com/wiki/Cooling_Down_Your_Horse_Correctly

Quote · 2628 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 

Hi Again:

To answer your second question.... first your senior horse will need free choice high quality hay.  It takes older horses longer to eat and they usually eat smaller amounts throughout the day.  Second, there are some great feeds created just for senior horses.  They are usually in pellet form.  If your horse has trouble chewing you can add warm water to the grain to make a mash.  One product is Purina Equine Senior, but there are others.

Quote · 1706 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 

Well first when you get off the horse, remove the saddle.  Walk her around a few times, and feel her chest and belly for heat.  Once her body has returned to normal temperature, you can also go rinse her off with a hose.  I do not like the theory that cold water is fine.  I sure wouldn't like it.  I would use barely warm water, starting with her legs, and then up to her belly, back, neck, and backside.  You don't have to soak her, just a light rinse.  Then lead her outside, weather permitting, and let her graze on some grass for a half hour while you brush her off and let her dry.

 

 

Quote · 1706 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 

Well first when you get off the horse, remove the saddle.  Walk her around a few times, and feel her chest and belly for heat.  Once her body has returned to normal temperature, you can also go rinse her off with a hose.  I do not like the theory that cold water is fine.  I sure wouldn't like it.  I would use barely warm water, starting with her legs, and then up to her belly, back, neck, and backside.  You don't have to soak her, just a light rinse.  Then lead her outside, weather permitting, and let her graze on some grass for a half hour while you brush her off and let her dry.

 

 

Quote · 1559 days ago · 0 people like this ·
 

Make sure to keep up the annual checks with the dentist, older horses can have problems chewing and need a high fibre diet and added energy. If your willing to pay, there are Veteran mixes available to suit an oldies diet. Any pellet forms should be dampened a bit.
With all new horse owners I advise you to pick up the books and learn as much aaaas possible :) 
For cooling down I would advise 

                                         -While riding include a ten minute cool down until breathing becomes regular.

                                         -Hop down remove tack, and put on a headcollar then walk her until her body temp. cools down.

                                         - If it's warm and sunny out then feel free to hose her off and let her out to pasture.

                                         - If its mild out just sponge the sweaty area's with warm water.

                                         - On very cold days allow the sweat to dry while wearing a fleece or net cooler rug and then groom really well.

 

Its important to groom dry sweat around the girth area as it can cause galls and sores.

Good Luck with your new horse

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