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Buying Your First Horse

 

 

 

Buying Your First HorseBuying Your First Horse

 

How to Buy Your First Horse

Be sure the horse is healthy and well-suited to your purposes before purchasing him.

Things You’ll Need:

Books On Horsemanship
Local Horse Magazines
Prepurchase Exams
Horse Brushes
Horse Halters
Horse Reins
Horse Saddles

Step 1:

Determine your purpose for buying a horse. For example, do you want to jump or ride trails, ride for pleasure or for competition?

Step 2:

Choose the type of horse best suited for that purpose. For example, a racehorse may not adjust well to life on the trail.

Step 3:

Find a horse by visiting a horse breeder or local stable. Ask professional trainers for information on where to look for a horse. Examine ads in horse breeding and riding magazines.

Step 4:

Seek help from a professional trainer when selecting a horse.

Step 5:

Obtain a prepurchase exam from a veterinarian.

Tips & Warnings:

Read a book on horsemanship to learn what to look for in a horse.
 
The only way to be sure the horse is healthy and fit for his intended use is to get a veterinary exam before you buy him.

Typical purchase costs vary greatly, depending on the horse's age and level of training. They can range from hundreds to thousands of dollars or even more.
 
Consider leasing a well-trained horse before buying your first horse.
Remember that keeping a horse is a luxury - you may pay up to $200 a month for a pasture situation and anywhere from $200 to $800 a month for boarding in an organized stable, depending on what's offered (feeding, cleaning, exercising, training).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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