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Charles Wood, 2nd Earl of Halifax

Charles Ingram Courtenay Wood, 2nd Earl of Halifax (3 October 1912 – 19 March 1980) was a British politician and peer.[1] He was styled Lord Irwin from 1934 until 1959.

Wood was the son of Edward Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax, statesman and Foreign Secretary. Lord Halifax had almost become Prime Minister in 1940 upon the resignation of Neville Chamberlain. The younger Wood also entered politics, becoming Member of Parliament for the City of York in 1937, as a Conservative.

In 1936, he married Ruth, daughter of the Liberal politician Neil Primrose, and the grandaughter of Prime Minister Lord Rosebery.

In 1939, at the outbreak of World War II, Wood rejoined the Royal Horse Guards and served for three years in the Middle East. He continued as a Member of Parliament during this time. At the 1945 general election, he lost his seat to the Labour candidate, Dr John Corlett.

Wood succeeded his father as 2nd Earl of Halifax in 1960. In 1978, his horse Shirley Heights won the Epsom Derby.

References

  1. "Charles Ingram Courtenay Wood, 2nd Earl of Halifax". thePeerage.com. Darryl Lundy. 27 November 2008. http://www.thepeerage.com/p2259.htm. Retrieved 2009-08-09. 


Parliament of the United Kingdom




[[Category:UK MPs 1935



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