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Choosing a Morgan Horse

Choosing a Morgan Horse











Choosing a Morgan Horse

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Choose a Morgan Horse

The Morgan horse is the breed most commonly used by the U.S. government for its cavalry and national parks mounted programs.

Step 1:

Note the characteristics of the breed. Morgans have a clean-cut head with a broad forehead and tapered muzzle. Their ears are short, shapely and wide-set. They have compact bodies with a slightly arched neck and a deep, wide chest. Their front legs are straight with refined muscling. Their hindquarters are deeply muscled. Morgans have a high-set tail that's full and long and a full mane. They have a short, broad back, which makes them very versatile.

Step 2:

Remember an average-sized Morgan will stand 14.1 to 15.2 hands and weigh between 900 and 1,100 pounds.

Step 3:

Realize that Morgans come in all colors.

Step 4:

Understand that Morgans are quick learners with curious personalities. They are known for their long lives, intelligence and athleticism.

Step 5:

Combine the speed of a Thoroughbred, the good sense of a quarter horse, the majesty of an Arabian and the dance of a Peruvian Paso, and you'll get a Morgan horse.

Tips & Warnings:

Contact the American Morgan Horse Association at P.O. Box 9600-HR, Shelburne, VT 05482; (802) 985-4944.
 
Horses have unique personalities just like people do. Take some time to get to know an individual animal before purchasing it.


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