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Fairview Plantation

Fairview Plantation was built around the year 1800 by Baruch Duckett in Collington, Maryland.[1] The house is a transitional federal/Greek revival design considered to be a significant part of the Prince George's County heritage.[2] Fairview is a two-story stuccoed brick plantation house with flush end chimneys and a unique stepped gable at one gable end. Its Georgian plan interior features fine Federal style trim.[3]

Contents

History

Upon his death in 1810 at Fairview, Duckett left the estate to his son-in-law, Captain William Duckett Bowie. The will stipulated that William Duckett Bowie and his sons should have Fairview as long as they did not cut down certain trees standing near the house but "if the said Bowie, or any of his children should fell the trees, then the property shall go to my brother, Isaac Duckett."[4] Bowie's son, Maryland Governor Oden Bowie was born at Fairview in 1826 and was buried on the grounds in 1894.[5]

File:Fairiew 1936.jpg
Fairview in 1936

In the 1980s, land that made up the plantation consisted of a turf farm and woods. The owners of the estate sold most of the land to the Rouse Company who built a housing development that bears the name Fairwood on the site.[6] While not currently on National Register of Historic Places, the Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission is the local authority and considers the house and cemetery to be a historic site, #71A-13.[7]

The descendants of Baruch Duckett live in the house as of 2006.[8]

Significance in Thoroughbred Racing

Oden Bowie, perhaps inspired by Samuel Ogle's nearby Belair Stables and the Belair Stud, founded a stable at Fairview that produced successful race horses including Belle D'Or, Oriole and Crickmore.[9]

Further reading

References

  1. Arnett, Earl; Brugger,Robert J., Papenfuse, Edward C. (March 22, 1999). Maryland: A New Guide to the Old Line State. The Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 401. ISBN 978-0-8018-5980-9. 
  2. "Heritage Themes" (PDF). Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission. September 2006. http://www.mncppc.org/county/Illustrated_Inventory906/Heritage_Themes.pdf. Retrieved 2007-08-16. 
  3. (PDF) Illustrated Inventory 906. Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission. pp. 86. http://www.mncppc.org/county/Illustrated_Inventory906/74_101.pdf. Retrieved 2007-08-17 
  4. Hall, Clayton Colman (1912). Baltimore: Its History and Its People, vol.3. Lewis Historical Publishing Co. pp. 303–306. http://books.google.com/?id=DMcLAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA304&vq=%22oden+bowie%22&dq=thomas+fielder+bowie#PPA304,M1. 
  5. "The Prince George's Hall of Fame". Prince George's County Historical Society. 2003. http://www.pghistory.org/HallofFame. Retrieved 2007-08-16. 
  6. "The History of Fairwood". General Growth Properties. http://www.fairwoodcommunity.com/vis1.htm. Retrieved 2007-08-16. 
  7. "Prince George's County Planning Board No.04-29 File No. DSP-03068 Resolution" (PDF). Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission. http://www.mncppc.org/pgco/planning/agendas/2004%20Resolution%20PDFs/04-29.pdf. Retrieved 2007-08-16. 
  8. (PDF) Illustrated Inventory 906. Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission. pp. 86. http://www.mncppc.org/county/Illustrated_Inventory906/74_101.pdf. Retrieved 2007-08-15 
  9. Arnett, Earl; Brugger,Robert J., Papenfuse, Edward C. (March 22, 1999). Maryland: A New Guide to the Old Line State. The Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 401. ISBN 978-0-8018-5980-9. 



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