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Farrier


File:Roberts camera 650.jpg
Some farrier tools

A farrier is a specialist in equine hoof care, including the trimming and balancing of a horse's hoof and the placing of shoes to the horse's foot. A farrier couples a subset of the blacksmith's skills (fabricating, adapting, and adjusting metal shoes) with a subset of veterinary medicine (knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb) to address the care of the horse's feet.

At one time, the jobs of farrier and blacksmith were all but synonymous. A farrier's work in colonial America or pre-Industrial Revolution Europe would have included horseshoeing as well as the fabrication and repair of tools, the forging of architectural pieces, etc. Today, farriers usually specialize in horseshoeing, focusing their time and effort on the care of the horse's foot. For this reason farriers and blacksmiths are considered to be in separate, albeit related trades.

A farrier's routine work is primarily hoof trimming and shoeing. In ordinary cases it is important to trim each hoof so that it retains its proper orientation to the ground. If the animal has a heavy work load, works on abrasive footing, needs additional traction, or has pathological changes in the foot, then shoes may be required.

Additional tasks for the farrier include dealing with injured and/or diseased hooves and application of special shoes for racing, training or "cosmetic" purposes. Horses with certain diseases or injuries may need remedial procedures for their hooves, or need special shoes.

In the United Kingdom, it is illegal for anyone other than a registered farrier to call themselves a farrier or to carry out any farriery work under the Farriers (Registration) Act 1975.[1] The primary aim of this act is to "prevent and avoid suffering by and cruelty to horses arising from the shoeing of horses by unskilled persons". In the United States, however, farriery is generally not regulated and consumers must inform themselves as to a farrier's qualifications. The American Farrier's Association (AFA) maintains a voluntary certification program.

In the USA The Guild of Professional Farriers maintains a voluntary program through which qualified farriers may obtain a formal credential indicating that they meet a meaningful standard of professional competence as determined by technical knowledge and practical skills examinations, length of field experience, and other factors.[2]

See also

  • Worshipful Company of Farriers
  • Rasp

References

  1. Farriers (Registration) Act 1975, http://www.opsi.gov.uk/RevisedStatutes/Acts/ukpga/1975/cukpga_19750035_en_1 
  2. RF™

External links



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