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King (horse)

<tr><th scope="col" colspan="2" style="text-align:center;">Honors</th></tr><tr><td colspan="2" style="text-align:center;">American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame</td></tr><tr style="font-size:80%; font-weight:lighter; text-align:center; color:#555;"><td colspan="2">Horse infobox last updated on: January 12, 2008.</td></tr>
King P-234
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Breed: Quarter Horse
Sire: Zantanon

<tr><th>Grandsire:</th><td>Traveler</td></tr>

Dam: Jabalina

<tr><th>Maternal grandsire:</th><td>Strait Horse</td></tr>

Gender: Stallion
Foaled: 1932
Country: United States
Color: Bay
Breeder: M. Benavides Volpe
Owner: Charles Alexander, Byrne James, Winn DuBose, Jess Hankins
Honors
Horse (Equus ferus caballus)


King P-234 was an outstanding early Quarter Horse stallion who influenced the breed throughout the early years of the American Quarter Horse Association (or AQHA).

Contents

Life

King was born June 25, 1932, the offspring of Zantanon and Jabalina.[1] Originally named Buttons by his breeder[2], he was renamed King when he was registered with the AQHA as number 234. He was a bay stallion, bred by Manuel Benavides Volpe of Laredo, Texas and owned at the time of registration by Jess L. Hankins of Rocksprings, Texas.[3] The AQHA gave his sire as Zantanon by Little Joe by Traveler and his dam as Jabalina by Strait Horse by Yellow Jacket by Little Rondo (Bunton Horse).[3] His second dam was a mare by Traveler, making him inbred to Traveler.[4][5]

Volpe sold Buttons/King to Charles Alexander of Laredo, Texas as a weanling for $150. Later, Byrne James of Encinal, Texas bought King from Alexander for $325. It was James' wife that changed the horse's name from Buttons to King.[2][6] James broke King and used him for roping and other ranch work, but when James joined the New York Giants organization to play baseball, King was sold to Winn DuBose of Uvalde, Texas for $550.[6] However, eventually DuBose sold King to Jess Hankins of Rocksprings, Texas on July 5, 1937 for the sum of $800.[6]

He died on March 24, 1958 of heart failure.[7][6]

He was the sire of many famous Quarter horses including Brown King H, Martha King, Royal King, King's Pistol, Gay Widow, Black Gold King, Power Command, Poco Bueno, Continental King, and LH Quarter Moon.[8] Two of his sons were inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame, those being Poco Bueno and Royal King.[9] His daughter Taboo was the dam of Joe Cody, another member of the AQHA Hall of Fame.

He was inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame.[9]

Pedigree

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Traveler
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Little Joe
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sykes' Rondo
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jenny
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
May Mangum
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Zantanon
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Big Jim by Sykes' Rondo
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Billy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jeanette
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sykes' Rondo
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
mare by Sykes' Rondo
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
King P-234
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Little Rondo by Lock's Rondo
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yellow Jacket
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Barbee Dun by Lock's Rondo
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Strait Horse
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gardner quarter mare
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jabalina
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Traveler
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
mare by Traveler
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
unknown
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Notes

  1. Holmes King P-234: Cornerstone of an Industry p. 38
  2. 2.0 2.1 Volpe "Breeder of King P-234 Comments on Great Quarter Horse" The Cattleman May 1958 p.105-107
  3. 3.0 3.1 AQHA Official Stud Book and Registry Combined 1-5 p. 86
  4. All Breed Pedigree Pedigree of King retrieved on June 22, 2007
  5. Denhardt Foundation Dams p. 141-142
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 Beckman "King" Quarter Horse Journal August 1990 p. 36, 174-179
  7. Simmons, Legends: Outstanding Quarter Horse Stallions and Mares p. 30
  8. Pitzer The Most Influential Quarter Horse Sires p. 64-65
  9. 9.0 9.1 AQHA Hall of Fame accessed on February 3, 2008


References

  • American Quarter Horse Association Official Stud Book and Registry Combined Books 1-2-3-4-5 Amarillo, Texas:American Quarter Horse Association 1961
  • Beckman, Bruce "King" Quarter Horse Journal August 1990
  • Denhardt, Robert M. Foundation Dams of the American Quarter Horse Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press 1982
  • Holmes, Frank King P-234: Cornerstone of an Industry Abilene, KS: Loft Enterprises 2004
  • Pitzer, Andrea Laycock The Most Influential Quarter Horse Sires Tacoma, WA:Premier Pedigrees 1987
  • Simmons, Diance C. Legends: Outstanding Quarter Horse Stallions and Mares Colorado Springs:Western Horseman 1993
  • Volpe, M. Benavides "Breeder of King P-234 Comments on Great Quarter Horse" The Cattleman May 1958

External links

Further reading

  • Davis, Roy C. "King P-234" Quarter Horse Journal April 1952
  • "King: Short Saga of a Horse Who Deserves His Name" Western Livestock Journal October 15, 1945
  • Widmer, Jack "King - Unmistakably a Great Sire" Western Livestock June 1958
  • Wilkinson, Garford "M. Benavides Volpe: He Bred King P-234" Quarter Horse Journal August 1962



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