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Mark Johnston (racehorse trainer)

Mark Johnston (born October 10, 1959) is a racehorse trainer based in Middleham, North Yorkshire, England.

In 2004 he won the 1,000 Guineas with Attraction. Other successful horses he has trained are Mister Baileys, winner of the 2,000 Guineas, Shamardal, 2004 European Champion Two-Year-Old, and Double Trigger, winner of the Ascot Gold Cup.

Johnston has been training in Middleham since 1988 when he purchased Kingsley House (often falsely attributed to be the former home of Charles Kingsley, author of The Water Babies).

His success is at least in part due to the fantastic natural facilities available to him and other Middleham based trainers on the nearby gallops.

Johnston's horses are known for their front running style and bravery in a finish, two attributes that were best advertised by the exploits of Attraction.

The motto of the stable is "Always Trying".

Major wins

Flag of United Kingdom Great Britain

  • Ascot Gold Cup - (3) - Double Trigger (1995), Royal Rebel (2001, 2002)

Flag of Germany Germany


Flag of Republic of Ireland Ireland


Flag of Italy Italy

  • Gran Criterium - (3) - Lend a Hand (1997), Pearl of Love (2003), Kirklees (2006)

Flag of United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates

References



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