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Partner (horse)

Partner was a Thoroughbred racehorse and an important sire, who continued the Byerley Turk line.

Partner
Sire Jigg
Dam Mare by Curwen Bay Barb, a sister to Mixbury
Grandsire Byerley Turk
Damsire Curwen Bay Barb
Gender Stallion
Foaled 1718
Country Great Britain
Color Chestnut
Breeder Charles Pelham of Lincolnshire
Owner Mr. Cotton of Sussex, Lord Halifax, John Croft of Barforth, Yorkshire
Summary
Partner is a thoroughbred racehorse out of Mare by Curwen Bay Barb, a sister to Mixbury by Jigg. He was born around 1718 in Great Britain, and was bred by Charles Pelham of Lincolnshire.
Horse (Equus ferus caballus)
Last updated on August 22, 2007


Partner's breeder sold him to Mr. Cotton of Sussex, who in turn sold him to Lord Halifax. Lord Halifax raced the colt with great success over 4-mile courses. He was unbeaten in 1723 and 1724, taking the following year off to come back to the track in 1726, beating Sloven in a match race. His only loss was in a race in 1728 to Smiling Ball, after which he was sold to John Croft to begin his breeding career.

His most important son was Tartar, who went on to sire the very influential Herod. He also sired Cato, Golden Ball, Sedbury, and Traveller, as well as the dam of Matchem, before his death at 29.



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