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Quarab

Quarab
Country of origin: United States
Breed standards
International QuaRab Horse Association: Breed standards
Horse (Equus ferus caballus)

A Quarab is a cross between an American Quarter Horse and an Arabian Horse.

The Quarter horse is known for speed and tractability, and the Arabian for its agility and stamina. Both breeds are highly intelligent. This cross is an attempt to integrate the best traits of both breeds. The United Quarab Registry was developed in 1989 to promote the cross. The Painted Quarab Index was added in 1991 to include the colorful tobiano and overo patterns of the American Paint Horse. Only horses with Quarter Horse, Arabian, and Paint blood are accepted and both parents of eligible horses must be registered with the respective registry for that breed.

The Quarab's body type may resemble more the stock-horse type with muscular forearm and gaskin and well-rounded hip, or the Arabian type with long, well-arched neck, long barrel, and level croup. The head usually shows refinement, large eyes, wide forehead, and slight to extreme dish in the face, depending on the ratio of Arabian to Quarter Horse blood. Height ranges from 14 to 16 hands.

The Quarab is suited to many events, such as roping, reining, dressage, trail riding, jumping, driving, and endurance riding.

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