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Swedish Ardennes

Swedish Ardennes
Country of origin: Sweden
Horse (Equus ferus caballus)


Swedish Ardennes are a medium build heavy draft breed of horse. They were bred in Sweden in the late 1800s as a result of farming popularity. Swedish Ardennes were bred by crossing imported Ardennes (a heavy draft breed from Belgian and Northern France) with the North Swedish horse. The goal was to develop a heavier horse than the native Swedish horses.

Features

Swedish Ardennes are 15.2-16 hands high. Their small head is heavy with smallish eyes, they have a neck that is short and thick, a short back, a wide chest, and shoulders that are well muscled. Swedish Ardennes have an immensely muscular compact body, short legs, and little feathering. They are black, brown bay, and chestnut. They can withstand extreme variations in climate, are very strong, are exceptionally eager workers, and can survive on frugal keep. Swedish Ardennes are also known for their longevity, sweet and lively temper, and overall good health.

Swedish Ardennes today

Though farming is now done with machinery, the Swedish Ardennes are still popular as a cart horse, and are also used for hauling timber in mountain areas inaccessible to machinery.




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