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Tony McCoy

Anthony Peter McCoy OBE
200px
McCoy on Refinement in 2006
Occupation Jockey
Birthplace Moneyglass, County Antrim, Northern Ireland
Birth date 4 May 1974 ddmmyy
Career wins 3,000+
Major racing wins, honours & awards
Major racing wins
Grand National Winner
Honours
MBE


Anthony Peter McCoy, OBE (born 4 May 1974), commonly known as A. P. McCoy or Tony McCoy, is a Northern Irish horse racing jockey, widely regarded, based on his career wins, as the finest jump jockey to date.

Having recorded his first win at age 17 in 1992, by 2009 he had ridden over 3,000 winners and been named British jump racing Champion Jockey every year since 1995/6. His winners included the prestigious Cheltenham Gold Cup, Champion Hurdle, Queen Mother Champion Chase, King George VI Chase and the 2010 Grand National, at his fifteenth attempt.

Contents

Career

McCoy rode his first winner, 'Legal Steps', at Thurles, on 26 March 1992 at the age of 17. Success in Ireland soon led to a move across the Irish Sea, and he began riding in England in 1994. McCoy's main trainer was Martin Pipe but they parted ways. He had began working at a dealers yard when he was 15, and then apprenticed with Jim Bolger for 4 years.

McCoy has broken numerous records since he was granted a British licence, his first win in England coming at Exeter on 7 September 1994. He was soon off to a flying start by claiming a record 74 winners, and thus the conditional jockey championship, in the 1994-95 season. The following season he became champion jockey for the first time.

By the end of the decade he had set a new National Hunt record for winners in a season (253), equalled the record of five winners at the 1998 Cheltenham Festival, and became the fastest jockey to reach the 1000 winner mark.

McCoy went on to beat Gordon Richards' theretofore unbeaten record for winners in a season for all types of racing in 2002 (although by using modern technology McCoy was able to attend far more races than Richards). McCoy beat Richards' record of 269 winners in a season on 'Valfonic' at Warwick on 2 April 2002; he went on to end the campaign on 289.

McCoy soon achieved a new high of 289 winners, and on 27 August 2002, at Uttoxeter, his victory on 'Mighty Mantefalco' meant he had surpassed Richard Dunwoody's record of all time jumps winners and was now the leading jumps rider of all time.

On 3 October 2006 McCoy became the first jump jockey to ride 2,500 winners. McCoy rode his 3000th winner at Plumpton on the Nicky Henderson-trained 'Restless D'Artaix' in the Tyser & Co Beginners’ Chase on 9 February 2009. 'Restless D'Artaix' was sent off a 13-8 Favourite for the race.

McCoy has gone on to win 3000 winners and says he never stops dreaming of the day he'll reach 4000.

Grand National

Having won the Cheltenham Gold Cup, Champion Hurdle, Queen Mother Champion Chase and King George VI Chase, by 2010 McCoy had few targets left to chase, the most notable outstanding targets being to ride 300 winners in a season, and to win the Grand National.

The nearest McCoy had previously come in the National were three third-place finishes, in 2001 and 2002 aboard Martin Pipe's Blowing Wind (as the 8-1 favourite in 2002), and in 2006 on Jonjo O'Neill's 5-1 joint favourite, Clan Royal. In 2009 he finished 7th on Butler's Cabin, which started as 7/1 favourite.

He finally won the Grand National at the fifteenth attempt, on 10 April 2010 aboard Don't Push It, trained by Jonjo O'Neill and owned by J. P. McManus.[1]

Colours

File:Tony mccoy.jpg
Tony McCoy on Straw Bear, winner of the 2006 Fighting Fifth Hurdle

McCoy is retained by the Irish millionaire and avid horse-owner, J. P. McManus, and normally rides for ex-jockey Jonjo O'Neill's stable. McCoy can often be noticed riding a McManus horse by the owner's distinctive green and gold hooped jersey, often with a white cap.

Personal life

McCoy was born in Moneyglass, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. He wrote an autobiography, McCoy in 2003, to follow up his first book, Real McCoy: My Life So Far, released in 1999.

Standing at 1.78 m (5'10"), McCoy has been known to diet in order to make the low weights on some rides, starving himself down to 63.5 kg (10st) when his natural weight is about 9.5 kg (one and a half stone) more.[2]

Honours

  • Champion Jockey: 1995/96, 1996/97, 1997/98, 1998/99, 1999/2000, 2000/01, 2001/02, 2002/03, 2003/04, 2004/05, 2005/06, 2006/07, 2007/08, 2008/09, 2009/10
  • Lester Awards:
    • Conditional Jockey of the Year: 1995
    • Jump Jockey of the Year: 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009
    • Jockey of the Year: 1997 (award discontinued after 1997)

McCoy was appointed MBE in the 2003 Queen's Birthday Honours[3] and OBE in the 2010 Birthday Honours for his services to horse racing.[4][5]

Career statistics

Notable race wins

  • Champion Chase: Edredon Bleu 2000
  • Champion Hurdle: Make A Stand 1997, Brave Inca, 2006, Binocular 2010
  • Cheltenham Gold Cup: Mr. Mulligan, 1997
  • Irish Grand National: Butler's Cabin, 2007
  • Ryanair Chase : Albertas Run, 2010
  • Midlands Grand National : Synchronised, 2010
  • Bet 365 Gold Cup : Hennessy, 2009
  • Tingle Creek Chase : Master Minded, 2008
  • Melling Chase : Viking Flagship, 1996, Albertus Run, 2010

Winning milestones

  • 1,000th winner: Majadou, Cheltenham, 11 December 1999
  • 1,500th winner: Celtic Native, Exeter, 20 December 2001
  • 2,000th winner: Magical Bailiwick, Wincanton, 17 January 2004
  • 3,000th winner: Restless D'Artaix, Plumpton, 9 February 2009

Seasonal totals of winners

  • 1994/95 74
  • 1995/96 175
  • 1996/97 189
  • 1997/98 253
  • 1998/99 186
  • 1999/2000 245
  • 2000/01 191
  • 2001/02 289 (a British jumps record)
  • 2002/03 256
  • 2003/04 209
  • 2004/05 200
  • 2005/06 178
  • 2006/07 184
  • 2007/08 140
  • 2008/09 186
  • 2009/10 195

See also

References


External links



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